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MUSIC 4: Film Music  3 CREDITS

An introductory examination of music's role in Hollywood narrative film from the classic era (1930s and 1940s) to the present. MUSIC 4 Film Music (3) (GA)The course examines the role of music in narrative film, the premier art form of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The popularity, significance, and value of film art would not be what it is today if music had not become an integral--indeed, indispensable--part of motion pictures from the outset. Preliminary objectives will include basic musical information (the fundamental elements of music; the broad stylistic eras of western music and their associated characteristics; the culturally encoded language of tonal music and associated musical meaning) and the main techniques of narrative film. The main objectives of the course are: to identify and recognize the principles of nondiegetic music in narrative film; to identify and recognize the purpose and functions of music in narrative film; to recognize some of the historic eras/genres/trends in Hollywood film making; to identify and recognize selected films, directors and composers; to analyze and articulate the role of music in a given scene and in a given film; and to recognize underlying assumptions and values of the culture conveyed through the diegesis. These objectives will be met by addressing such questions as: What are the underlying principles of music in film? What are the functions of music/sound within a particular scene and how does it achieve those functions? What do we see of what we hear, and what do we hear of what we see--and why? What secrets does music tell? To what extent does music influence--even control-- our interpretation of a film? More broadly, to what extent do films reflect our culture, past and present--our interests, our values?

Bachelor of Arts: Arts
General Education: Arts (GA)
GenEd Learning Objective: Effective Communication
GenEd Learning Objective: Crit and Analytical Think
GenEd Learning Objective: Integrative Thinking


MUSIC 7: Evolution of Jazz    3 CREDITS

Study of the origins and development of jazz as an art form. MUSIC 7 Evolution of Jazz (3) (GA;US)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Evolution of Jazz is a course designed to examine the historical and sociological aspects of the American art form¿jazz. This general education course is for non-music majors. The material covered in this course begins with the precursors of jazz and then emphasizes the African American musical traditions and white American (initially European) influences that have shaped jazz as an American art form. This is followed by period studies of the various jazz styles: New Orleans Dixieland, Chicago Style, Swing, Bebop, Cool, Hard Bop, Modal Jazz, Free Jazz, Fusion Jazz, Neo-Bop, Latin Jazz, and the globalization of jazz. The various jazz styles are examined from musical, sociological, and economical perspectives. The major innovators and performers are identified and studied. As new styles are presented, a careful comparison to the previous style is done to help with classification. A major component of the course is listening. Early in the course listening skills are taught. Students learn how to recognize certain instruments, hear the various sections within a group, and identify forms. Evaluation methods may include quizzes, tests, open forums, discussion boards, a live jazz concert review, and a reflection paper. Students will receive GA credit for this course, as well as US designation. The course will not satisfy any requirements for the major or minor in music. For in-class sections of MUSIC 7, the course requires high-quality audio playback equipment, computer/projection, and keyboard/piano availability. For those sections of MUSIC 7 offered online, all pieces, excerpts, examples, videos, and texts will be made available to students online.

Bachelor of Arts: Arts
United States Cultures (US)
General Education: Arts (GA)
GenEd Learning Objective: Effective Communication
GenEd Learning Objective: Crit and Analytical Think
GenEd Learning Objective: Integrative Thinking


MUSIC 8: Rudiments of Music  3 CREDITS

Introduction to the elements of music: notation, scales, meter, rhythm, intervals; basic chord structure, cadences. MUSIC 8 Rudiments of Music (3) (GA)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. Learning the rudiments of music can be compared to the learning of a language. Students must learn to hear melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic patterns (audiation) before they sing, play or write in notation. In this introductory class, students are introduced to melodic, harmonic and rhythmic patterns by imitating the instructor who establishes these patterns at the piano, or by singing or as in the case of rhythm by striking a drum head. Eventually students will take turns "tossing" these patterns to teach other. Basic skills of improvisation can also be taught at this level of audiation by having students expand upon the basic patterns. As a result of these creative and aesthetic experiences, students will be able to translate the audiation of patterns into musical notation - moving from the smallest unit of a rhythmic motive towards the creation of a coherent rhythmic phrase. Similarly, at the melodic level, the student will begin with intervallic patterns and move towards the creation of a coherent melodic phrase. Intervals are then combined vertically to form harmonies. At the next stage of learning, students will learn to identify and to write that which they are hearing in dictation.This course in "musical literacy" enables students: (1) to deepen their appreciation of music (2) to begin studying a musical instrument and (3) to enter the rigorous study of music theory required of music majors.

Bachelor of Arts: Arts
General Education: Arts (GA)
GenEd Learning Objective: Effective Communication
GenEd Learning Objective: Crit and Analytical Think
GenEd Learning Objective: Key Literacies


MUSIC 9: Introduction to World Musics    3 CREDITS

This course introduces students to the study of world music as a cultural phenomenon through an examination of the music of Asia, Africa, West Asia, the Americas, and European folk. The course begins with an introduction to methods of examining world music and reframes the study of music as a cultural phenomenon, comprised not only of the music itself but also behavior and conception. This approach helps students move beyond their preconceived understanding of music in order to open their ears and minds to a wide variety of music and cultural concepts, forming the basis for the case studies that follow. The remainder of the course focuses on cultural conceptions of music, examined through the lens of a selection of case studies, including, but not limited to, the music of the Celtic nations, the African continent, Central and West Asia, India, Indonesia, Japan, and the Native American culture groups. The music of these cultures is explored both as a product and reflection of culture and as an aesthetic art form. Through this approach, students not only develop a basic fluency in the characteristics of selected world musics but also gain a broader understanding of the general classifications and geographical divisions of world music and the ways in which music relates to and is a part of all world cultures. Assigned analyses and a final project provide students with the opportunity to explore particular types of world music not covered in the lessons in greater depth, examining both the music itself and the social context in which it is found. These analyses require students to think actively about contemporary musical developments around the world, including how they are affected by current socio-political events and cultural trends. World musics are best understood when students engage in the music and in discussions of the music and culture; thus there is also a class participation/discussion component for the purposes of evaluation. The course utilizes an interactive, multimedia online curriculum, including video-recorded performances, audio examples, and music notation files. The text and all musical examples are available to students online. The course is available for GA credit and also meets the definition of an International Cultures course. It does not satisfy any requirements for the major or minor in music.

Bachelor of Arts: Arts
International Cultures (IL)
General Education: Arts (GA)
GenEd Learning Objective: Global Learning
GenEd Learning Objective: Integrative Thinking
GenEd Learning Objective: Key Literacies


MUSIC 109: The Music of the Beatles   3 CREDITS

The Beatles are the most significant musical group in the history of popular music. Their songs are derived from diverse sources, such as rhythm and blues, country and western, rockabilly, rock and roll, Motown, soul, folk rock, the British music hall, and the classical music traditions of Europe and India. MUSIC 109: The Music of the Beatles, an online course, will consider the music of the Fab Four by examining how John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison developed as songwriters. Besides an exploration of the Beatles' music, including the artists and styles of music that influenced them, this online course will include a study of the socio-cultural contexts from which the Fab Four emerged and in which they thrived. Finally, the course will introduce students to the fundamentals of music, as well as ways to integrate that knowledge with the interpretation of song texts.

Bachelor of Arts: Arts
General Education: Arts (GA)
GenEd Learning Objective: Effective Communication
GenEd Learning Objective: Crit and Analytical Think
GenEd Learning Objective: Key Literacies


MUSIC 207N: Jazz and the African American Experience   3 CREDITS

The history and evolution of jazz is a significant cultural manifestation of the African American experience. The music and its artists provide a lens through which to examine questions surrounding the African American experience and what it means to be Black in America, engaging with questions about identity, authenticity, freedom, activism, gender, and sexuality, as well as the role of music in African American life. Drawing upon curricular elements from MUSIC 7, Evolution of Jazz, and AFAM 100, Living While Black: Themes in African American Thought and Experience, this course traces the history of jazz through an examination of the lives and art of thirty great jazz artists, juxtaposed with an examination of seminal writings of twenty African American poets, playwrights, novelists, critics, activists, philosophers, and scholars. Preliminary objectives will include basic musical information associated with tonality and with jazz. The main objectives of the course are: to explore the antecedents of jazz and the social-historical contexts in which they developed; to explore the pioneering artistry of selected twentieth-century jazz musicians, tracing the evolution of jazz styles in the process; to delve into the lives of these jazz artists and the social-historical contexts in which they lived; to explore the writings of historically contemporary African Americans, which articulate many of the major issues that have shaped black life in America; to enhance appreciation for the art of jazz and for the musical and literary contributions of African Americans; to encourage reflection, empathy, and a greater understanding of the cultural-historical circumstances that have informed the lives and art of African Americans. The narrowing of scope allows for a more detailed examination of the selected jazz artists, their music, and their lives. Similarly, the selected writings will allow students to reflect on the relationships and connections between these writings and the artistry and life experiences of the selected jazz artists. These objectives will be met by utilizing an interactive, multimedia online curriculum, including demonstration videos, a virtual keyboard, music notation files (e.g., Sibelius), audio recordings, audio-video recordings, selected readings, open forums, and discussion boards. Evaluation methods will include quizzes, tests, open forums, discussion boards, and reflection papers. Students will receive GA and GS credit for this course, as well as US designation. The course will not satisfy any requirements for the major or minor in music. All pieces, excerpts, examples, videos, and texts will be made available to students online.

Cross-listed with: AFAM 207N

Bachelor of Arts: Arts
United States Cultures (US)
General Education: Arts (GA)
General Education: Social and Behavioral Scien (GS)
General Education - Integrative: Interdomain
GenEd Learning Objective: Effective Communication
GenEd Learning Objective: Crit and Analytical Think
GenEd Learning Objective: Soc Resp and Ethic Reason


MUSIC 209N: The Music of the Beatles and American Popular Culture    3 CREDITS

The Beatles are the most significant musical group in the history of popular music. Their songs are derived from diverse sources, such as rhythm 'n' blues, rock 'n' roll, country 'n' western, Motown, soul, folk music, folk rock, the British Music Hall, and European and Indian classical music traditions. Two ideas define their work: an emphasis on freedom, and how song texts can be interpreted in different ways. The Beatles had a great impact not only on American popular music during their heyday in the 1960s but also on the country' s popular culture in which they were considered philosopher kings. Beatle albums mirrored changing trends in the culture, from the pre-Vietnam War youthfulness of A Hard Day's Night, to the psychedelia of Revolver and Sgt. Pepper, to the countercultural mindset of The White Album. This inter-domain course will focus on how the Beatles influenced American popular culture from the 1960s to the present day. It will examine how the Beatles were a part of a mid-twentieth-century British youth subculture that was shaped by the cultural attitudes of American rock 'n' roll. The course will then turn its attention to the seismic shift initiated by the Fab Four in both music and pop culture in the US from 1964 to 1970, demonstrating how it has permeated the popular culture of the 1970s to the present day. The course will enhance the appreciation of the Beatles and their music through its interdisciplinary focus, contextualizing the Fab Four's work in order to show how both popular music and culture can influence one another. One way the course will facilitate this goal is through the inclusion of selected readings from English literature and popular culture upon which students will write reflection essays.

Cross-listed with: ENGL 208N
United States Cultures (US)
General Education: Arts (GA)
General Education: Humanities (GH)
General Education - Integrative: Interdomain
GenEd Learning Objective: Effective Communication
GenEd Learning Objective: Crit and Analytical Think
GenEd Learning Objective: Integrative Thinking

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